Posts Tagged ‘Randy Beavers’

August 21, 2012

Board of Water Works Trustees Names William Stowe as New CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works

DES MOINES, Iowa (August 21, 2012) – The Board of Water Works Trustees of Des Moines Water Works has selected Bill Stowe as CEO and General Manager.

“Bill Stowe is a capable leader who is well prepared for the challenges and opportunities facing Water Works, one of Des Moines’ greatest assets,” said Graham Gillette, Board of Water Works Trustees member and co-chair of the search committee.  “Bill Stowe is an innovator who understands the role Water Works plays in ensuring Central Iowa’s future.”

Stowe was one of five finalists interviewed by the Board of Trustees and questioned by employee and community panelists earlier this month. The five finalists were chosen from a large field of candidates. Stowe replaces Randy Beavers who has served Des Moines Water Works for 31 years, the last 5 as its CEO and General Manager.  Beavers will retire September 7, and Stowe will assume his duties on September 24. Des Moines Water Works is a regional water utility serving approximately 500,000 people in the Des Moines metro area.

“The five finalists were all outstanding.  Each would have brought a unique skill set to the job,” said Leslie Gearhart, Board of Water Works Trustees member and co-chair of the search committee.  “We are grateful to the employees and members of the community who helped screen candidates during this process.”

Stowe currently serves as Assistant Manager-Public Works/Engineering for the City of Des Moines, a position he has held since 1999.  Prior to that, Stowe was the Human Resources Director for the City of Des Moines, Operations Manager for MidAmerican Energy, as well as an analyst for Shell Oil, labor relations representative for Inland Steel Industries and a field examiner for the National Labor Relations Board.  Stowe has a B.A. from Grinnell College, a M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, a M.S. from the University of Illinois and a J.D. from Loyola University Law School.

“It’s a privilege to have an opportunity to lead this exceptional utility in service to our community. I welcome the opportunity to join with the employees of Water Works to continue to provide valued water services to our customers throughout the region,” said Stowe.

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About Des Moines Water Works
Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is a municipal water utility serving the citizens of Des Moines and surrounding communities (approximately 500,000 people). DMWW is an independently operated public utility with a commitment to leading, advocating and investing today and in the future to deliver water you can trust for life.

About the Board of Water Works Trustees
The Board of Water Works Trustees of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, consists of five members, appointed by the Mayor of the City of Des Moines for a term of six years. The Board of Water Works Trustees appoints Des Moines Water Works CEO and General Manager. The functions of the Board of Water Works Trustees can be described as policy making, appraisal, and evaluation.

 

Posted by: Laura Sarcone 1 Comment
Labels: , , , , , , Posted in About Us, Board of Trustees, Employees July 23, 2012

Board of Water Works Trustees Announces Candidates for CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works

DES MOINES, Iowa (July 23, 2012) – The Board of Water Works Trustees of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, announces five candidates for the position of CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works.  The Board of Water Works Trustees selected Colin Baenziger & Associates, a nationwide search for Des Moines Water Works, a regional utility serving approximately 500,000 people in the Des Moines metro area.

“The field of candidates for CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works is impressive,” said Leslie Gearhart, Board of Water Works Trustees member and co-chair of the search committee.  “The Board wanted to conduct a national search for a person with a proven track record as a leader and communicator. By the looks of the finalists we have chosen, we appear to be close to finding just that person.”

“The Board demanded the recruitment of the new CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works be an open and inclusive process,” said Graham Gillette, Board of Water Works Trustees member and co-chair of the search committee. “Naturally, the next stage will include the participation of employees, City of Des Moines leadership, business leaders, individual customers, and large customers throughout the metropolitan area.”

Candidates for the position of CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works are listed alphabetically.

Patrick Ball
Current position:  Utilities Director, City of Cedar Rapids, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Previous experience:  Director, Operations Manager, Operations Specialist and Solids Handling Operator, City of Cedar Rapids Water Pollution Control Department.

William Gilmore
Last position held:  Principal, Project Manager and Group Leader, CDM Smith, Edison, NJ.
Previous experience:  Deputy Director, Department of the Treasury, State of New Jersey. Executive Director, East Windsor Municipal Utilities Authority, East Windsor, NJ.

Kirk Hobbs
Current position:  Vice President-Community Relations and Economic Development Duke Energy (formerly Cinergy, PSI Energy), Plainfield, IN.
Previous experience:  Vice President-Business Relations and Development, Regional Director-Customer and Community Relations and Area Manager-Field Customer Relations, Duke Energy/Cinergy.

William Stowe
Current position:  Assistant Manager-Public Works/Engineering, City of Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa.
Previous experience:Human Resources Director, City of Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa. Operations Manager, Manager of Human Resources, Manager of Employee Relations, Manager of Labor Relations, MidAmerican Energy.

Jason Yarborough
Current Position:  Community Manager, Barefoot Bay, FL.
Previous experience:  Utilities Director, City of Palm Bay, Palm Bay, FL. City Manager, Groveland, FL.  Assistant City Manager/City Clerk, Mary Esther, FL.

The Board of Water Works Trustees invites the public to an open house to meet the candidates on Wednesday, August 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Des Moines Water Works, 2201 George Flagg Parkway. Each member of the Board of Trustees will individually interview each candidate the morning of Thursday, August 9.  Afternoon sessions consist of candidate interviews by the full board as well as two panels consisting of Des Moines Water Works employees and community representatives. Afternoon interview sessions are open to the public. The Board’s selection will be announced the week of August 13.

Current Des Moines Water Works CEO and General Manager, Randy Beavers, P.E., informed the Board of Trustees on April 1, of his retirement, effective September 7.  Mr. Beavers has been CEO and General Manager since December 2008, and served as Interim CEO & General Manager since December 2007, following the retirement of L. D. McMullen. Mr. Beavers began his career at Des Moines Water Works as Principal Engineer in 1981.

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About Des Moines Water Works

Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is a municipal water utility serving the citizens of Des Moines and surrounding communities (approximately 500,000 customers). DMWW is an independently operated public utility with a commitment to leading, advocating and investing today and in the future to deliver water you can trust for life.

About the Board of Water Works Trustees

The Board of Water Works Trustees of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, consists of five members, appointed by the Mayor of the City of Des Moines for a term of six years. The Board of Water Works Trustees appoints Des Moines Water Works CEO and General Manager. The functions of the Board of Water Works Trustees can be described as policy making, appraisal, and evaluation.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in About Us, Board of Trustees October 8, 2010

Water Conservation – Could You Reduce Your Water Use?

“When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water.” – Benjamin Franklin

If you’ve ever been without water temporarily or have had to conserve, it doesn’t take you long to truly value the convenience of turning on the faucet and immediately having water at your disposal, whether it be for drinking, bathing, cooking, or cleaning.

According to livescience.com, the average amount of water used daily by an Ethiopian is 3 gallons as compared to 30 gallons per day for a Briton.  Americans, as you probably suspected, use the most water per day, averaging 150 gallons per person per day.  How would we “survive” if our water usage was drastically restricted?  Could you give up showering every day to do laundry on the “off” days?  A five-minute shower uses about 20 gallons, less if you have a newer low-flow shower head. One load of laundry requires 10-20 gallons.  (Front loading washing machines use less than top loading machines.)

Another thing to think about, but is impossible to monitor, is how much water does the average person waste per day?  I think it would be fair to assume that Ethiopians waste much less water than Americans.  While brushing your teeth or washing your car in your driveway, do you let the water run the entire time or turn it off and on as needed?

Those are two examples of using water wisely which are taught to elementary students through the Urban Environmental Partnership (UEP). Formed in 2000, Des Moines Water Works partners with Metro Waste Authority, City of Des Moines Storm Water Utility, and Wastewater Reclamation Authority to educate students about preserving our natural resources.

Are you a wise water consumer? What ways are you conserving water?

Posted by: Randy Beavers No Comments
Labels: , , , Posted in Conservation, Value of Water October 6, 2010

Potential 2011 Water Rate Increase: We’ll Pay as We Go

DMWW Board of Trustees has not made a specific decision about the size of any water rate increase for 2011.   They will do so at their October 19, 3:30pm Board meeting.  The Trustees have only concluded thus far that water rates and charges need to keep pace with the utility’s Cost of Services. Rates will be set before board members vote on the utility’s budget in November. If approved at the October 19 Board Meeting, water rates will take effect April 1, 2011.

Instead of taking on debt to invest in improvements, a water rate increase is being considered to help bring revenues in line with costs. We have a lot of money invested in water pipes, pumps and treatment plants, and we need to keep up with that investment in maintaining those facilities.  DMWW’s revenue has not kept pace with costs since 2003.  DMWW pays all of its operating expenses but is not collecting sufficient revenue to pay for the needed infrastructure improvements.  The Board of Trustees recognizes DMWW cannot continue this trend without saddling future rate payers and generations with a large tab because of the failure now to set rates and charges to cover the true cost of the utility’s operations.

In spite of these financial and source water challenges, DMWW continues to produce high quality water for our customers.  One example of our exemplary water quality is the recognition received in April 2008 by Forbes.com who ranked Des Moines as being the best city in America for clean drinking water.

Rates for the typical Des Moines customer could go up between 10 percent and 13 percent next year to help bring revenues in line with costs. That would result in water bills that are $1.50 to $2.00 more per month for a two-person household.  Monthly increases would range between $2.00 and $3.00 for the average four-person household.  Currently, the water portion of the bill for an average two-person household is about $15.00 a month and roughly $25.00 for a four-person home.

The proposed rate increase is in response to increases in costs to treat the water and maintain our distribution system. DMWW is committed to spending our limited resources wisely and continually evaluates our programs to be as efficient as possible.

Chemical prices are expected to increase approximately 5 percent in 2011. While significant, the increase is less than those seen over the past few years.  Complex pollution issues in the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers, such as routinely elevated levels of fecal bacteria, often complicate the treatment process. Various stretches of the two rivers are on Iowa’s impaired waters list because of problems with bacteria, algae and nitrates, among numerous biological impairments. Water Works staff continues to emphasize the need for aggressive improvements in the sprawling watersheds that feed into the rivers.

Also, wetter-than-average summers over the past three to four years have led to decreased demand and relatively flat water sales.

The last rate increase was April 1, 2009.  The availability charge, the fixed amount of the water bill intended to cover Water Works fixed costs per customer whether or not any water is used, was increased by $2.00 per month in April 2010.

Posted by: Randy Beavers 1 Comment
Labels: , , Posted in Rates, Value of Water