Posts Tagged ‘EPA’

October 6, 2014

Your Comments Needed for the Waters of the U.S. Rule

One in three Americans gets their drinking water from rivers and streams that are vulnerable or impaired, including the 500,000 central Iowans who depend on the Raccoon and Des Moines Rivers as the source of their drinking water.

Iowans must speak out and demand clean water in our rivers that is essential for drinking, swimming, and fishing. Clean water is critical to viable communities and economic growth. Sixty percent of streams and millions of acres of wetlands across the country are not clearly protected from pollution and destruction.

Over 40 years ago, Congress passed the Clean Water Act. The focus was to, through regulatory means, remove raw sewage and industrial pollution from rivers and lakes. Thanks to cleanup efforts spurred by the Clean Water Act, the pollution from these sources has decreased immensely or been eliminated.  Unfortunately, agriculture was exempt from most provisions of the Clean Water Act, and today, is the largest contributor to water pollution in Iowa’s rivers and the country. It is time to expand the Clean Water Act regulations to include all sources of pollution – including agriculture.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have proposed stronger protections for the clean water vital to all Americans, but agriculture continues to be exempted. The proposal is the Clean Water Act-Waters of the United States rule. Agriculture exemptions have degraded Iowa’s rivers and lakes and should no longer be allowed. Iowans must engage in protecting water resources by demanding the support of Iowa’s congressional delegates and state legislators to expand regulations in the Clean Water Act to include sources of agricultural pollution.

The current EPA-Corp of Engineers proposed rule is open for public comment until October 20, 2014. Do your part to support the current proposal, but also ask for expansion of the Clean Water Act to include agricultural sources of pollution. Your drinking water, your health, the ability to fish and swim in Iowa rivers and lakes, and the economic viability of our communities is dependent on your actions today. Future generations are depending on you. Submit your comments at: www.epa.gov/uswaters.

For additional information:

Posted by: Linda Kinman 1 Comment
Labels: , , , , , Posted in Source Water, Water Quality September 30, 2014

Middle School Students, EPA Region 7 Administrator Talk Water Quality

DSC_0452EPA Region 7 Administrator Karl Brooks will be in Des Moines, Iowa, on Friday, Oct. 3, to visit with Brody Middle School seventh grade students about EPA’s role in protecting water quality. Brooks’ visit will include a role-play exercise featuring six groups of students representing EPA, scientists, farmers, concerned citizens, Des Moines Water Works, and non-profits. Afterwards, a group of students will participate in a water quality testing exercise at Des Moines Water Works Park.

Brooks will discuss the importance of EPA’s partnerships to protect water quality in Iowa, and the Waters of the U.S. proposal. EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released a draft proposal in March to strengthen protection for the clean water that is vital to all Americans.

The students are learning about Iowans’ water pollution reduction efforts, Iowa’s nutrient reduction strategy, and best management agricultural practices to improve water quality.

Brody Middle School serves about 780 sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students within the Des Moines Public School District.  Brody is an International Baccalaureate candidate school where learning is incorporated with an understanding of how individuals fit into the world and how their actions affect others.  Approximately 120 seventh graders have been learning about water quality at Brody.

The Des Moines metropolitan area’s 500,000 residents receive their drinking water from Des Moines Water Works, which draws water from the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. The quality of these rivers is fundamental to providing safe drinking water for the public health of the Des Moines community.

  • WHO: Karl Brooks, EPA Region 7 Administrator
  • WHAT: Remarks, role-play student exercise and students learning about water chemistry (all events are open to the press).
  • WHEN: Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, 1:00 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., Brooks’ remarks and activity at Brody Middle School; 2:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., Water quality testing at Des Moines Water Works Park.
  • WHERE: Brody Middle School, 2501 Park Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50321 and Des Moines Water Works Park, 412 Fleur Drive, Des Moines, Iowa 50321. After entering the park, watch for signage to the pond.

Clean water is important for drinking, swimming, farming, fishing, businesses and communities.  Sixty percent of streams and millions of acres of wetlands across the country aren’t clearly protected from pollution and destruction. One in three Americans—117 million of us—get our drinking water from streams that are vulnerable.

To help celebrate October as Children’s Health Month, EPA works with parents, teachers, and health providers to promote environmental education and healthy environments for children. EPA recognizes the importance of educators’ in incorporating environmental education in their classrooms and teaching methods.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , , , , , Posted in Source Water, Water Quality August 2, 2011

Iowa Public Drinking Water Annual Compliance Report

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) administers the Public Drinking Water Program in Iowa under delegation of authority from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The 1996 re-authorized Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requires that each state prepare an annual report on violations of national primary drinking water regulations within the state.

A public water supply (PWS) is defined as a system that provides water to the public for human consumption. In Iowa, there are 129 surface water systems, 28 groundwater systems that are under the influence of surface water, and 1,809 groundwater systems. 45% of the population is served by surface water or groundwater under the influence of surface water systems and 55% are served by groundwater sources. The mission of Iowa DNR’s Public Drinking Water Program is to protect and enhance the public health, safety, and quality of life for all persons by ensuring the public drinking water is safe to drink. The overall drinking water program compliance figures in 2010 continue to be very similar to those in the previous two years.

Compliance with Health-Based Standards

  •  No waterborne diseases or deaths were reported from Iowa public water supply systems (PWS) in 2010.
  •  Over 2.62 million people (of the 2.84M people served by PWS) regularly received water from systems meeting all health-based drinking water standards.
  • Health-based drinking water standards were met by 91.0% of the 1,966 regulated public water supplies. There were 176 public water supplies that had 351 violations of a health-based drinking water standard: maximum contaminant level (MCL), maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL), treatment technique (TT), or action level (AL).
  •  Eighteen of the more than 80 regulated contaminants were found at levels that exceeded the health-based standards during 2010. The top four contaminants based on total health-based standard violations, along with the percentage each contributed to the total number of health-based standard violations are; Total Coliform Bacteria (58.4%), Nitrate Nitrogen (8.3%), Fecal Coliform Bacteria (7.4%), and Nitrite Nitrogen (6.8%). Six other health-based standards were each exceeded at least once during the year: the maximum contaminant levels for chlorite and uranium; and treatment techniques for nitrate, contact time, gross alpha, and significant deficiencies not promptly corrected.

The complete 2010 report can be found on the IDNR website at, http://www.iowadnr.gov/Portals/idnr/uploads/water/wse/2010SAR.pdf

Posted by: Linda Kinman No Comments
Labels: , , , , , , Posted in Health, Water Quality