Archive for the ‘Customers’ Category

July 25, 2018

New Aquifer Storage and Recovery Well Serving Central Iowa Customers

Des Moines Water Works has utilized aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) wells as sources of water since late 1990s. These wells are installed deep into the Cambrian-Ordovcian Aquifer, also referred to as the Jordan Aquifer, and are used to store drinking water that is needed when water demand is high. When water demand is low, mainly during winter months, drinking water is injected into the wells which displaces the native Jordan Aquifer water. Up to 450 million gallons can be stored in an ASR well during the winter months when Des Moines Water Works has excess water treatment capacity. In summer months, during higher water demand, the drinking water is pumped out of the ASR well and into the water distribution system for use by customers.

West Des Moines Water Works, a wholesale customer of Des Moines Water Works, needed to purchase additional water from Des Moines Water Work to meet the needs of Microsoft Corporation. To meet the water demand requirements of Microsoft, West Des Moines Water Works, City of West Des Moines and Des Moines Water Works entered into a Chapter 28E Agreement to construct a new ASR Well facility. The Army Post Road ASR Well facility will be placed in service this summer and will provide an additional 3 million gallons of water per day to help serve Microsoft and other Des Moines Water Works’ customers.

The total cost of this project is $6.1 million. The City of West Des Moines and the West Des Moines Water Works paid $4.655 million of the cost while the Des Moines Water Works paid $1.4 million dollars. The Des Moines Water Works also provided the 5.28 acre site for the Army Post Road ASR Well facility along with the engineering design and construction management for the project.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in Customers, Water Treatment June 18, 2018

Updated Security for Credit Card Payments on DMWW Website

As of June 1, 2018, industry online security standards have changed because previous versions have been shown to be vulnerable to attack.  Companies that accept payments by credit card, including Des Moines Water Works, are no longer supporting the security protocol known as TLS 1.0, and are instead supporting versions TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2.  In order to initiate online transactions from older browsers, it may be necessary to update your PC to include the latest version of your browser.    The minimum accepted versions after June 1, 2018 are:

  • Internet Explorer: 11 (Current 11)
  • Google Chrome: 44 (Current 60)
  • Firefox: 38.1 (Current 55)
  • Edge: 12 (Current 15)
  • Opera: 30 (Current 47)
  • Safari: 9 (Current 11)
  • Safari Mobil: 8 (Current 11)
  • Android OS Browser 5.1 (Current 8)

We strongly recommend users upgrade their internet browser and anti-virus software to the latest version available to maintain the highest level of security.  Customers will be unable to initiate payments online at www.dmww.com until their browser has been updated to the minimum version listed above.

This change is mandated by the PCI (Payment Card Industry) Security Council and affects all merchants and service providers that transmit credit card data. Please update your operating system and browsers to ensure compliance with these new safety protocols.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone 2 Comments
Labels: , , Posted in Customer Service, Customers February 1, 2018

Water Main Replacement Program

Water main replacement planning is a necessary, preventative approach that saves money on repairs, reduces the loss of water that occurs as a result of the main breaks, and minimizes disruption to customers.  Des Moines Water Works budgets for water main replacement to maintain and upgrade the distribution system by replacing water mains that have a history of breaks, to improve the fire flow, relocating to accommodate city, county, or state construction projects, and upgrading water mains to meet the needs of customers.

Several factors impact which water mains are replaced and the approach to planning for 2018 was different than in years past.  Des Moines Water Works’ Long Range Plan through 2040 included the analysis of water main break data occurring within the system.  Through this analysis, a relative risk score was created based on the assessment of consequence of  failure, likelihood of failure, and a capacity factor.  Pipe segments consisting of risk scores in the highest range are highly recommended for replacement.  Staff from various departments provided input while creating the priority list of streets for water main replacement.  Des Moines Water Works’ 5-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) includes approximately $7 million of water main replacement each year.  The City of Des Moines also has a 5-year CIP for city streets and sewers.  Des Moines Water Works and the City of Des Moines work collaboratively to choose the streets to be the most cost effective and cause the least disruption to customers.

After each project is designed, Des Moines Water Works will receive bids from contractors and the construction contract will be awarded to the contractor that will be performing the work.  If the bids received allow Des Moines Water Works to complete all the streets within budget, construction will take place in 2018.  Construction not completed in 2018 will take place in future years.  Des Moines Water Works is currently contacting customers directly in the neighborhoods throughout Des Moines and Polk County that have been scheduled for water main replacement in 2018.  Additional customer letters and public meetings will be forthcoming.  Des Moines Water Works appreciates the cooperation and understanding from customers during construction and will work with contractors to minimize the inconvenience to customers impacted by the following projects:

Polk County Water Main Replacement – CONTRACT 1

  • NE 14th Street from I-80/35 Westbound Off Ramp to NE 43rd Avenue

Des Moines Water Main Replacement – CONTRACT 1

  • Thomas Beck Road from Crown Colony Court to 1401 Thomas Beck Road
  • Fleur Drive from George Flagg Parkway to SW 22nd Street
  • Maple Street from E 2nd Street to E 4th Street
  • E 4th Street from Maple Street to Des Moines Street
  • Alternate Street – Watrous Avenue from SW 14th Street to Glover Avenue

Des Moines Water Main Replacement – CONTRACT 2

  • SW 9th Street from Johnson Street to Amos Avenue
  • SW 10th Place from Southdale Drive to County Line Road
  • SW 11th Street from Southdale Drive to County Line Road
  • SW 15th Street from Army Post Road to Johnson Street
  • Alternate Streets – SE 8th Street from E Miller Avenue to E Rose Avenue and Wall Avenue from SW 13th Place to SW 12th Street

Des Moines Water Main Replacement – CONTRACT 3

  • Kenyon Avenue from SW 16th Street to SW 9th Street
  • SE 14th Street from E Diehl Avenue to E Thornton Avenue
  • SE 14th Street from E Thornton Avenue to E Watrous Avenue
  • Alternate Street – Pioneer Road from SE 14th Street to 1603 Pioneer Road
Posted by: Laura Sarcone 1 Comment
Labels: , , , Posted in Customer Service, Customers, Infrastructure January 18, 2018

Community Partnerships

Des Moines Water Works is committed to being a vital contributor to the betterment of our community.  Each year, we consider contributions and sponsorships with external organizations that advance the utility’s mission, vision and strategic initiatives.  In 2017, Des Moines Water Works provided over $13,000 to local organizations with curriculum or events designed to build awareness and appreciation for the value of water as a vital resource or build awareness for source water quality and quantity.  A few of these organizations include: Community Youth Concepts, Polk County Conservation, Water Rocks! and Whiterock Conservancy.

More information about Des Moines Water Works’ sponsorship program and an online sponsorship application is available at www.dmww.com/about-us/sponsorships. All requests for in-kind and/or financial support must be made by February 28 of each year using the online form.

Des Moines Water Works thanks its community partners working to provide education, appreciation for and accessibility of safe and affordable drinking water.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , Posted in About Us, Customers December 29, 2017

On Call 24/7 to Respond to Main Breaks

As cold weather arrives, water main breaks can become more common.  The months of December, January and February bring the highest number of water main breaks.  Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) crews repair an average of 300 water main breaks each year.  Although DMWW has a proactive and aggressive main replacement program, underground water mains can break for a number of reasons including corrosion, frost heave, water temperature, and pressure fluctuations.

When a water main breaks, generally water comes to the surface and flows across the ground to a storm sewer or waterway.  Large water main breaks can reduce water pressure in the area and the flowing water can cause damage.  If you witness a main break or see water flowing in the street, please call Des Moines Water Works Dispatch at 283-8772.  Des Moines Water Works is committed to providing our customers with safe and abundant drinking water.  To honor that commitment, DMWW crews are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to respond to main breaks, ensuring that your service is restored as quickly as possible.

Once a water main break has been confirmed, the exact location of the break is determined using acoustic leak detection equipment.  This equipment listens to the sound the water makes as it exits the pipe and can determine the location of the leak based on the intensity of the sound.  When the location of the leak has been determined, water service in the area must be shut down so the break can be repaired.  Des Moines Water Works uses Automated Notification System to to communicate water outages to affected customers.  For more information and to make sure DMWW has your correct contact information, visit: http://www.dsmh2o.com/automated-notification-system-2/ 

The safety of our employees and the public during a main break repair is a top priority.  Special attention is given to trench safety which protects our employees and to traffic control which protects our employees as well as the traveling public.  Before the water service is restored, the repaired water main is flushed and sampled to restore the best possible water quality.  An average main break takes 4-6 hours to repair.  You can find current water outages at www.dmww.com.

When the water comes back on, there will likely be air in your water service piping.  It is a good idea to run the first water after an outage through a faucet that does not have an aerator screen, such as a bathtub. Open faucets slowly to allow the air to escape.  Air will make a spurting or hissing sound as it escapes through the faucet.  Once the water is flowing, allow the faucet to run for a minute or two. The first water may be cloudy due to air in the water or particles that dislodge as the pipes fill with water. This should clear fairly quickly.  If water is cloudy throughout the house and it does not clear after allowing the water to run for several minutes, contact Des Moines Water Works Dispatch at 283-8772.

If the kitchen or bathroom faucets do not perform normally following a water outage, it may be necessary to remove the aerator screen.  Typically, the aerator can simply be unscrewed from the faucet. Inspect the screen for small particles and rinse away any you find.  Reinstall the aerator and test performance of the faucet again.  If you experience difficulties such as low pressure throughout the house following a water outage, contact Des Moines Water Works Dispatch at 283-8772 for assistance.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in Customer Service, Customers October 16, 2017

Des Moines Water Works Inaugural Citizen Water Academy

Des Moines Water Works hosted 24 participants (including metro area County Supervisors, Public Works Directors, public health professionals, and business, neighborhood and education leaders) for the first session of the Citizen Water Academy on October 12; which coincided with a nationwide initiative called, “Imagine a Day Without Water.”  While most people understand that water is important, many still take it for granted.  It is our hope that participants not only come away from the Citizen Water Academy with a better understanding of their local water utility, but are also equipped to help lead the discussion on important water issues in our community.

The concept of a Citizen Water Academy is not one that was born here at Des Moines Water Works.  It is something Des Moines Water Works CEO and General Manager Bill Stowe was made aware at a conference among his peers of the largest water utilities in the country.   The San Diego County Water Authority has been offering its Citizen Water Academy since 2014.  They had a need to better educate the public and community leaders about water management during a severe drought.  While the challenges in Des Moines are different than those in San Diego, we too have a need to better educate and engage the public that depends on us for safe and abundant drinking water.

Des Moines Water Works has successfully supplied drinking water to central Iowans for nearly 100 years; however, the associated planning, production, distribution, monitoring and challenges presented by deteriorating source water are not common knowledge among most citizens.  The Citizen Water Academy is designed to help current and emerging leaders in our community learn and appreciate our most important natural resource, the water we depend on for life.  Participants will receive a total of 16 hours of instruction, tour multiple treatment plants operated by Des Moines Water Works, listen to presentations from soil and water experts, and interact with expert Des Moines Water Works staff over the four sessions of the program.  The goal of the Citizen Water Academy is to arm citizens with data and information to better understand the workings of a drinking water utility.  Additionally, participants learn some of the challenges Des Moines Water Works faces on a regular basis in delivering safe, affordable and abundant drinking water to over 500,000 people in central Iowa.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in About Us, Customers July 25, 2017

Change is Coming

Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is excited to announce we have partnered with Invoice Cloud, a web-based, electronic invoice presentment and payment company, to provide faster, more convenient billing services to our customers. The new online payment and e-bill service offers more flexibility in paying DMWW bills, including paperless billing and pay by text. No registration will be required to view an online replica of paper bills or to pay a bill.

Des Moines Water Works chose Invoice Cloud as our new online bill pay service provider due to their commitment to providing the highest standards in Internet security. Invoice Cloud will safely store all of your financial information using Payment Card Industry (PCI) compliant systems. This includes truncating (abbreviating) account numbers so that even DMWW does not see your complete account information.

In conjunction with the launch of the Invoice Cloud platform, the convenience fee for all credit/debit card payments made online or by phone will increase to a flat rate of $2.75 per transaction. This includes payments made through our recurring credit card program. DMWW is committed to ensuring customers have a no-cost electronic payment method available, and all electronic check (ACH) transactions, including automatic payments using electronic check, will be free of charge.

In addition, the online transaction limit for credit card payments will decrease from $5,000 to $500 per transaction. These changes will go into effect late summer 2017.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , Posted in Customer Service, Customers July 7, 2017

Iowa’s ‘Move Over’ Law Now Includes Utility Vehicles

Move over and slow down. Iowa’s longstanding safety slogan and official law since 2002, has been broadened by the 2017 Iowa Legislature to include other public agencies and private companies working within the right of way.  The expanded law, effective July 1, requires motorists to change lanes (or slow down if changing lanes is not possible) when approaching stationary emergency vehicles, tow trucks, highway maintenance trucks, and utility vehicles for water, electric, natural gas, telephone, cable, and waste and recycling services.

Des Moines Water Works welcomes the expanded law, which now recognizes utility vehicles. “As our crews and field staff work to restore water after a main break or provide service at customers’ home, they are in increasingly in harm’s way due to distracted drivers,” said Bill Stowe, CEO and General Manager. “This expanded law to include utility vehicles raises driver awareness and encourages motorists to use caution when approaching a utility vehicle. Please move over and help us to help you.”

For more information, visit www.moveoveriowa.com

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , Posted in Customers, Employees June 29, 2017

Board of Water Works Trustees Receive and File $178 Million Five Year Capital Improvement Plan

The Board of Water Works Trustees received and filed staff’s recommended five year capital improvement plan at their regularly scheduled board meeting on June 27.  While the Board did not take immediate action on specific projects within the capital improvement plan, it does lay the groundwork and set a course for investments needed to meet federal drinking water standards, improve or expand water infrastructure, and enhance technology through 2021.  In the fall of 2017, the Board of Water Works Trustees will approve one year operating and capital budgets for calendar year 2018.

“The five year Capital Improvement Plan is the most aggressive view of the capital improvements Des Moines Water Works may need over the next five years,” said Bill Stowe, CEO and General Manager, Des Moines Water Works. “The plan includes improvements for source, treatment, storage, pumping, and transmission, for the benefit of the central Iowa region.”

The capital improvement plan is intentionally comprehensive, with over $178 million in investments identified.  It establishes a path of anticipated needs based on a defined set of assumptions, such as population growth and water quality.  The plan will change as assumptions are modified based on actual experience, such as regulatory requirements, demand growth, and water quality vulnerabilities.

Concurrently, staff is developing and finalizing, with significant input from suburban customers through the Central Iowa Regional Drinking Water Commission’s Technical Advisory Committee, a long range plan through 2040.  The Long Range Plan will be a framework for water needs in the Des Moines metro area for the next 20 years.  This five year plan is a step toward the long range plan.

The five year plan includes important source, treatment, storage and transmission projects identified in the 2040 long range plan like a shallow alluvial wellfield along the Des Moines River which will provide natural denitrification of source water, expansion of the nitrate removal facility, two new aquifer storage and recovery wells, additional transmission mains to suburban customers, increased water main replacements within Des Moines and unincorporated Polk County, and the design of an expansion at Saylorville Water Treatment Plant.

Des Moines Water Works is committed to managing and optimizing available financial resources.  Financing may involve a combination of bonding, grants, water rates, purchased capacity, and State Revolving Fund (SRF) loans.  Many components of the plan are “modular,” and may be completed in smaller increments over time to allow for more flexibility in financing and to ensure investments meet changing priorities.

“The five year capital improvement plan demonstrates today’s prioritization of infrastructure plans, under constant review. Water system infrastructure improvements are critical to the health and success of our community.  Des Moines Water Works has been providing safe, affordable and abundant drinking water to Central Iowa since 1919 and is committed to meeting the region’s needs for the next 100 years,” said Stowe.

Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in Board of Trustees, Customers, Infrastructure, Rates, Water Quality June 8, 2017

Keep your cool, stay hydrated

We know we need to stay hydrated during these hot days of summer. But what drink is the best? Grab a glass of Des Moines Water Works tap water.

Tap water is safe and affordable

Municipal tap water in the United States is some of the safest water you can drink. You can go to nearly any city in the country and drink the water without giving its safety a second thought. Nonetheless, many people choose to spend more for bottled water. Studies show that bottled water is no safer than tap water, yet bottled water costs almost 2,000% more. An 8 ounce glass of water can be refilled approximately 15,000 times for the same price as a six pack of soda.

Replace sports drinks with H2O

A common myth is sports drinks are needed during and after a sports game or workout to recover. The fact is unless you work out hard for more than one hour, the fluids lost through sweat can be replaced with plain water. Drinking sports drinks when you don’t need them can lead to gaining weight. Sports drinks may be appropriate for competitive sports that last more than one hour, but during the day and at most sports practices, water is the best drink.

More tips to stay hydrated:

  • Don’t wait until you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcoholic and caffeinated beverages.
  • Check on elderly family and neighbors.
  • Remember to replenish your pets’ water dish frequently.
Posted by: Laura Sarcone No Comments
Labels: , , , , Posted in Customer Service, Customers, Health, Value of Water